Coming soon… NEW Inclusive Education Video & Participatory Training Guide

06/06/2017

Welcoming face

EENET is making a brand new teacher training video illustrating real-life inclusive education approaches and practices. This long awaited resource will include a participatory teacher training facilitation guide. The guide will enable trainers to use the video in a variety of ways, for short and longer training courses, with new or experienced teachers as well as with other people working in education.

Why is EENET making this new resource?

EENET originally set out to address a shortage of information on inclusive education focused on countries often referred to as being in the Global South* and the need for free information about inclusive education in resource-poor contexts. Over the years we have received more requests for support, not in understanding what inclusive education is, but in moving to the next level – understanding how to practically implement the ideas that are available on paper.

We noticed that among the thousands of inclusive education video’s available online, many contained good messages about inclusive education, but little practical guidance. They left the viewer thinking “great idea, but how do I make this happen in reality?” Our new video and training guide takes an important step towards filling this gap.

Over the coming weeks running up to the video’s launch on World Teacher’s Day, 5th October 2017, we will show you behind the scenes and introduce you to some amazing teachers, parents and students who we hope will inspire you to make your own educational community more inclusive.

Blog photo 2

To learn more about EENET’s Inclusive Education Video & Participatory Training Guide:

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EENET’s new video-based teacher training resource has been made possible thanks to grants from Open Society Foundations and Light of the World.

 

* The Global South includes the nations of Africa, Asia, Central and Latin America that are less developed or have limited resources. The term comes from the idea that a large number of these countries are located in the southern hemisphere.


Call for Articles for Enabling Education Review Issue 6, 2017

03/04/2017

The theme of the 2017 edition of Enabling Education Review will be:

“Young People’s Views of Inclusive Education”

The deadline for submitting first drafts of articles is 31 July 2017. This year, as the title suggests, we want articles written by children and young people. Contact info@eenet.org.uk with any questions or to receive a full information pack on how to facilitate writing sessions.

Details of suggested topics and how to submit articles are provided below.

  1. Why have we chosen this topic?

In 2017, EENET is celebrating 20 years of promoting inclusive education and sharing experiences from around the world. Learners, particularly children and young people, are at the centre of inclusive education, but often their opinions are ignored. Therefore, EER 6 will focus on the voices of young learners. We want to know about their experiences of inclusive schools, classrooms or other education settings. We also want to see their visions and ideas for how to make education environments more inclusive.

  1. What could children/young people submit?

We are looking for both written submissions and drawings from children and young people under the age of 25 years.

A written submission could be in the style of an article or news report. We also welcome poems, songs, short fictional stories or even posters.

We would also like to receive lots of different drawings, including cartoon strips that tell a story, and maps showing the inclusive or non-inclusive parts of a school.

If you are a teacher, parent, youth worker or other person working with children and young people in education, you may need to provide them with some encouragement and support to write or draw a submission for EENET. However, it is important that you give the children and young people freedom to express their opinions. We have written a brief guide to help you with this.

 

  1. What could children/young people write or draw about?

 We would like to know about children and young people’s experiences of inclusive education and/or their ideas about making education more inclusive. This is a very broad subject.

The following are some ideas for topics:

They could write about themselves, e.g.:

  • What makes you feel happy, safe or welcome in school?
  • Who is your favourite adult at school? Why?
  • When did you do something at school that made you proud of yourself?
  • When do you feel left out of things at school?
  • What are your dreams and hopes for the future? How does education fit into these?

 They could write about their experiences of school or another educational experience, e.g.:

  • Describe a good teacher.
  • What makes your school inclusive or accessible?
  • Are there issues related to food, water, sanitation, or getting to and from school?
  • Who helps you and who helps your teachers?
  • Who are your friends at school? Why are they your friends?
  • What is difficult about going to school? Why?
  • What is fun about going to school? Why?
  • Do you have a school council in your school? What do they do?
  • Do you get consulted about what happens in your school?
  • Describe something that happened in school that made you laugh.

 They could write about inclusive education, e.g.:

  • Begin or end your article with “For me, inclusion means…”
  • Have you been involved in any campaigns to help children who are not in school to get into education?
  • Are sports or arts important to including people in school? Why?
  • What stops you from going to school?
  • Do you get to talk about how inclusive your school is? If so, explain.

They could write about their education experiences outside of school:

  • Do you learn outside of school? If so, explain.
  • What makes you really annoyed, frustrated or sad about education/school?
  • Who are your heroes/heroines? Why?

 Or they could write about another personal experience of education.

If children and young people choose to write fictional stories (something made up, for instance describing their ideal school or a perfect lesson), please write a note on the submission to tell us that it is fictional.

  1. How can you submit a written piece or drawing?

Format – Written pieces can be submitted electronically as a Word document, or as plain text in an email message. Our email is info@eenet.org.uk. We also accept submissions via private message through our Facebook page.

Handwritten documents can be submitted. You can send original handwritten documents to us via post, or they can be scanned/photographed and emailed to us.

We are also happy to accept audio or video recordings, if the young authors want to read aloud what they have written and record it on a camera or phone. You can email us the audio/video file if it is small enough, or use a file-sharing site. Contact us if you need advice about sending us an audio or video file. Please ensure that the child and his/her parents/carers are aware that we may want to share the audio or video file on our website. If they agree, they should give you written permission for this.

Please ensure you include the name, age, grade, school and contact details for every child or young person who submits something.

 Length – Written pieces should be a maximum of 500 words. Photos and/or drawings can be sent to accompany the written piece.

Editing – Written pieces will be edited by EENET’s editors. Also a team of young people from different countries will be asked to read and comment on the written pieces and drawings.

Photos – If you are sending photographs or scans of drawings to accompany written pieces, the images must be high resolution (the jpeg file should be at least 1mb in size). We may want to publish your photos in EER or on our website, so if the photos show people’s faces, please ensure you get permission from these people (or their parents/carers). We have included a simple permission form that you can adapt if you want to.

Drawings – We need to ensure that drawings will reproduce clearly in EER. Please ensure that children and young people use black lines and bold colours for their drawings. Drawings in light pencil unfortunately will not reproduce clearly and we won’t be able to publish them.

Deadlines – the first deadline for draft submissions of articles is 31 July 2017. But we welcome submissions as soon as possible so we can spread the editing workload. We will review all written pieces and work with the authors to edit them if necessary, and we will review and select drawings to publish.

Selection – please note that we might not publish all of the written pieces and drawings we receive as we are limited by the length of the publication. We try to ensure that the final selection includes submissions:

  • from a variety of countries/regions
  • about a range of different issues
  • from authors/artists of different ages, abilities and educational levels.

Written pieces and drawings that are not selected for publication in EER may instead be published on EENET’s website (www.eenet.org.uk) or used on EENET’s Facebook page.

Queries – if you have any questions, please email info@eenet.org.uk.

Postal address ­– if you want to send a written piece or drawing in hard copy or as an audio recording (e.g. on CD), please send to:

EENET, PO Box 422, Hyde, Cheshire, SK14 9DT, UKly


Call for Articles for “Enabling Education Review” Special Edition, 2017

03/11/2016

The theme of this special edition will be:

 “Inclusive education and street-connectedness”

 The Enabling Education Network (EENET) is publishing this extra edition of the Enabling Education Review.

The deadline for submitting first drafts of articles is 23 June 2017. Details of suggested topics and how to submit your articles are provided below. Contact info@eenet.org.uk with any questions.

 

  1. Why have we chosen this topic?

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and Sustainable Development Goal 4, aim to achieve inclusive and quality education for all, particularly focusing on children from the poorest households who are four times more likely to be out-of-school (SDG UNDP 2015). In order to improve the quality of education systems so that they become more inclusive, it is important to understand in each context which groups of learners are more likely to be excluded from, and what barriers they face to participating and achieving in, education. Street-connected children and youth is one such group that is often facing exclusion from and within formal education. Around the world existing programmes are successfully providing street-connected children and youth with education. Sharing their stories provides an opportunity for similar or new programmes to learn from their experiences. Also, education for street-connected children is often innovative and offers new ideas that could be adapted to support the inclusion of other marginalised learners in challenging situations.

 

  1. What could you write about?

We want to read about your experiences of supporting inclusive education for street-connected children and young people.

Enabling Education Review helps people share and learn from each other’s experiences. We therefore welcome articles that offer practical insights into education programmes, to help others who are looking for ideas that they can adapt and try. We like articles that provide a little background to the project or programme, and then explain how the project/programme is structured, its main objectives, and what activities are carried out, where, when, with or by whom, and why. And we like to read about the results of the too, if possible.

While this special edition focuses on a specific group of learners – children and young people in street situations – this group is not homogenous, offering a wide range of possible topics for articles. Street-connected children and young people face many different challenges, depending on the local context and their gender, age, disability, health status, ethnicity, and so on. The organisations that support them are therefore delivering many different interventions. Some projects focus just on one sector, like education; others are multi-sectoral and support education, health, social welfare and protection needs. Some education projects for street connected children and youth are separate from mainstream education, other initiatives seek to find ways to help these excluded learners return to mainstream education.

Possible topics include:

Types of interventions

  • Non-formal basic education programmes for children and young people living and/or working in street situations and currently unable to attend formal schools
  • Programmes that support children and young people to enrol in or return to mainstream/formal education (e.g. accelerated education or catch-up programmes)
  • Programmes that support mainstream schools and teachers to understand about street-connected children and young people, and then adapt their curricula, materials, timetables, etc, to become supportive of these learners, so that they can enrol in or return to formal education
  • Programmes that support older street-connected youth with catch-up basic education, literacy, numeracy, etc, and vocational and life-skills education
  • Programmes that support specific groups of street-connected children and young people, such as girls or boys, those with disabilities, those affected by drug, alcohol or substance abuse, those affected by HIV and AIDS, those who are from refugee or migrant communities, and so on
  • Programmes that connect various sectors, to support holistically the health, welfare, livelihoods and/or protection needs of street-connected children and youth, as well as their education
  • Programmes that offer educational support for pre-school-age street-connected children
  • Programmes that provide support to street-connected girls with babies so that they can continue their education
  • Advocacy programmes that have sought to change government and/or school policies to enable street-connected learners to access and participate in mainstream and/or non-formal education.

Financing and resourcing

  • Examples of budgeting / fundraising for more inclusive educational responses for children and young people in street situations.
  • Examples of advocating with donors for financial, material or human resource support for making education for children and young people in street situations more inclusive.

Sustainability

  • Examples of interventions that have sought to maintain improvements in inclusivity, or make wider education system changes.

Stakeholders’ views

  • We love to publish articles that feature the views or stories of stakeholders involved in delivering inclusive education, or benefiting from inclusive education. These can be case studies in their own right, or examples and quotations presented within an article on a specific topic.

 

  1. How can you submit an article?

Please email your article to info@eenet.org.uk or send a hard copy to the address at the end of this document.

Length – either 550 words (for a single-page article) or 1,100 words (for a double-page article). We may edit longer articles down to a single page, depending on the quantity and quality of articles received.

Style – please keep the article easy-to-read and non-academic. We encourage the use of sub-headings, bullet lists, etc. Have a look at previous editions of the publication if you are not sure what style to use: www.eenet.org.uk/resources/eenet_newsletter/index.php

Editing – we are very happy to help with editing the article, so don’t worry if you are not an experienced writer. We can work with you to improve the structure and content of your article, make it shorter/longer, etc.

Photos – it is great if you can add photos, drawings or diagrams to your article. When selecting photos, please look for the following:

  • Active images – e.g. children learning in groups, children playing, teachers working with pupils, parents taking actions to support the school, and so on
  • Images that are not too dark, blurred or pixelated.

Please send us high resolution images by email (these should be at least 1mb in size), or post us an original print/drawing. For every image you want to add to your article, you will probably need to remove about 75-100 words of text – but we can help with this editing. Please ensure that the people in any photos have given their permission for the photos to be published, or that parents/guardians have given permission for photos of children to be used. With each photo, please include the name of the photographer/organisation and a brief caption (activity, location, date, etc.).

Deadlines – the first deadline for draft submissions of articles is 23 June 2017. But we welcome submissions as soon as possible so we can spread the editing workload. We will then review all articles and work with the authors to edit them.

Selection – please note that we might not publish all of the articles we receive. In addition to ensuring that we publish articles that are easy-to-read and of practical use to a range of education stakeholders, we will also ensure that the final selection includes:

  • articles from a variety of countries/regions
  • articles about a range of different issues
  • articles by authors from different backgrounds (e.g. teachers, NGOs, parents, academics, government representatives, etc).

 

Articles that are not selected for publication in EER may instead be published on EENET’s website (www.eenet.org.uk).

Queries – if you have any questions, please email info@eenet.org.uk.

Postal address ­– if you want to send an article in hard copy or as an audio recording (e.g. on CD), please send to: EENET, PO Box 422, Hyde, Cheshire, SK14 9DT, UK


Call for Articles for “Enabling Education Review” 2015

02/05/2015

The theme for the 2015 newsletter will be:

“Inclusive education management”

 

1. Why have we chosen this topic?

This year we would like the Enabling Education Review (EER) to share practical experiences of planning, budgeting and fundraising for, managing, monitoring and evaluating inclusive education initiatives.

EENET has the benefit of being both an information network and a consultancy service provider. Through this diverse work we are privileged to learn about many different inclusive education initiatives – we get to see what makes them work well, and the problems they face.

For instance, we have seen first-hand that organisations and governments often invest heavily in baseline studies, but these studies are not always high quality or used effectively to inform project/programme design. We see that budgeting and resourcing for inclusive education can be a challenge, particularly when seeking funding to scale-up and move beyond pilot projects or model schools. We carry out many evaluations. A common challenge is the limited qualitative and quantitative record keeping, making it very difficult to collate information for the final evaluation. We also notice that more money is spent on final evaluations than on mid-term reviews, yet a high quality mid-term review (and/or effective ongoing monitoring) can enable improvements to be recommended and implemented ‘before it’s too late’.

However, we also know that there are organisations and governments working hard to improve their approaches to inclusive education planning, budgeting, fundraising, monitoring and evaluation. We therefore want to provide an opportunity for those involved in such initiatives to document and share their experiences.

 

2. What could you write about?

 Here are some ideas…

 

Planning

  • Your experience of conducting a high quality, practical and relevant baseline study. In particular we would like to hear about efforts to conduct participatory baselines, involving stakeholders and beneficiaries in the research activities (and even as researchers), so that the baseline process becomes an integral part of the initiative (not just a formal or academic ‘outsider research’ process).
  • Your experience with participatory planning – ensuring that your inclusive education initiative responds to the needs and ideas of stakeholders and beneficiaries; and/or ensuring that the initiative is planned as a genuine collaborative effort between NGO and government.

 

Financing and resourcing

  • Your experience with convincing large/international donors to support inclusive education (particularly convincing them to provide longer-term support – because inclusive education is not a ‘quick fix’).
  • Your experience with developing funding strategies that ensure shared financial responsibility between local/national government and NGOs, or which promote increased financial responsibility from the government for inclusive education.
  • Your experience of successfully reallocating resources to support inclusive education (rather than seeking new/extra resources).
  • Your experience with developing community-level financial, material or human resource support for inclusive education.

 

Monitoring and evaluation

  • Your experience of developing approaches that enable implementers/managers, stakeholders and beneficiaries to regularly reflect on and document their experiences, throughout the life of the inclusive education initiative.
  • Your experience or reflections on what makes a useful, high quality mid-term review or final evaluation.
  • Your experience with developing relevant and useful indicators for measuring progress/impact.
  • Your experience of developing joint monitoring and evaluation mechanisms, so that multiple partners (e.g. NGOs and government) contribute and learn collaboratively.

 

How do you submit an article?

Please email your article to ingridlewis@eenet.org.uk or send a hard copy to the address at the end of this document.

Length – either 550 words (for a single page article) or 1,100 words (for a double-page article). We may edit longer articles down to a single page, depending on the quantity and quality of articles received.

Style – please keep the article easy-to-read and non-academic. We encourage the use of sub-headings, bullet lists, etc. Have a look at previous editions of the publication if you are not sure what style to use.

Editing – we are very happy to help with editing the article, so don’t worry if you are not an experienced writer, we can work with you to improve the structure and content of your article, make it shorter/longer, etc.

Photos – it is great if you can add photos, drawings or diagrams to your article. Please send us high resolution images by email (these should be at least 1mb in size), or post us an original print/drawing. For every image you want to add to your article, you will probably need to remove about 75-100 words of text – but we can help with this editing. Please ensure that the people in any photos have given their permission for the photos to be published, or that parents/guardians have given permission for photos of children to be used.

Deadlines – the first deadline for draft submissions of articles is 30 June 2015.

But we welcome submissions as soon as possible so we can spread the editing workload. We will then review all articles and work with the authors to edit them. This process will happen July-August. We then aim to finalise articles and design the publication in September-October, so that it can be printed in November-December 2015.

Selection – please note that we might not publish all of the articles we receive. In addition to ensuring that we publish articles that are easy-to-read and of practical use to a range of education stakeholders, we will also ensure that the final selection includes:

  • articles from a variety of countries/regions
  • articles about a range of different issues
  • articles by authors from different backgrounds (e.g. teachers, NGOs, parents, academics, government representatives, etc).

Articles that are not selected for publication in the newsletter may instead be published on EENET’s website.

Queries – if you have any questions, please email ingridlewis@eenet.org.uk.

Postal address ­– if you want to send an article in hard copy or as an audio recording (e.g. on CD), please send to:

 

EENET CIC

37 Market Street

Hollingworth

Cheshire, SK14 8LS

UK


Welcome!

28/01/2012

Hello. Thanks for finding EENET’s blog!

What will we blog about?

Our blogs will all be related to education, inclusion, diversity, equality, etc – but will cover a wide range of topics. We will share practical and personal experiences and contribute to theoretical debates.

Who are our bloggers?

There will be a variety of people blogging here – EENET’s directors, consultants, volunteers, members and other invited authors.

Where else can you find EENET?

There are various places where you can stay in touch with EENET, and access the large collection of inclusive education information that we have available:

Website

Enabling Education Review (our annual publication)

Facebook

Twitter